Elaine Barry

Elaine Barry
Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Human Development and Family Studies
Office Phone
Office Location
Eberly Building, 206Q
2201 University Drive,
Lemont Furnace, PA 15456
    Biography

    Dr. Barry is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State Fayette. She joined the faculty in 2001 with a specialization in the cognitive development of children.

    Recent Awards:
    Winner, 2020 Penn State University-wide Faculty Excellence in Advising Award;
    Winner, 2018 Penn State University-wide Atherton Teaching Award;
    Winner, 2016-2017 College of Health and Human Development Excellence in Teaching Award

    Research Interests

    The development of explicit and implicit memory in children; Co-sleeping and infant development;
    Teaching methods to reduce plagiarism;
    Student attitudes about cheating; and the
    Effect of flexible work schedules on family-work balance.

    Publications

    What is “Normal” Infant Sleep? Why We Still Don’t Know, Psychological Reports - February, 2021

    Co-sleeping as a Proximal Context for Infant Development: The Importance of Physical Touch, Infant Behavior and Development - 2019

    Co-sleeping as a Developmental Context and its Role in the Transition to Parenthood - December, 2019

    Why Rates of Bedsharing are Rising, While Western Health Policy Advocates Condemn it, NCFR Report

    Syllabus for HDFS 239: Adolescent Development, Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) - 2011

    How reading to children enhances children's memory, Early Childhood Education: Issues and Developments - 2008

    Using office hours effectively, APS Observer - 2008

    What is "attachment teaching," and why do our non-traditional and first generation students need it?, Wings to the Future: Using Assessment to Grow Life-Long Learning - 2007

    Syllabus for HDFS 229: Infant and Child Development, Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology (OTRP) - 2007

    Does conceptual implicit memory develop? The role of processing demands., Journal of Genetic Psychology - 2007

    Can paraphrasing practice help students define plagiarism?, College Student Journal - 2006

    Children's memory: A primer for understanding behavior, Early Childhood Education Journal - 2006

    Depression, implicit memory, and self: A revised memory model of emotion., Clinical Psychology Review - 2006
    Collaborators: Mary Naus, Secondary Author; Lynn Rehm, Secondary Author

    Depression and implicit memory: Understanding mood congruent memory bias, Cognitive Therapy and Research - 2004
    Collaborators: Mary Naus, Secondary Author; Lynn Rehm, Secondary Author

    Education

    Ph D, Developmental Psychology, University of Houston

    MA, Psychology, University of Houston

    BS, Biology, Lamar University

    BS, Psychology, Lamar University

    Papers and Presentations

    November, 2020

    Posters
    Co-sleeping, Sleep Problems, and Sleep Consolidation - What is Normal Infant Sleep?
    Conference poster presentation
    Virtual (St. Louis, MO)

    November, 2019

    Posters
    Co-sleeping as a Developmental Context and its Role in the Transition to Parenthood
    Conference poster presentation
    Ft. Worth, TX

    September, 2018 - March 9, 2019

    Posters
    It’s More Okay to Cheat in an Online Class: How Student Variables and Teacher Characteristics Matter
    Conference poster presentation
    Paris, France

    Collaborator: Michelle Yezek, Author and Presenter

    November, 2018

    Posters
    Co-sleeping and Bioecological Theory: An Integrative Review
    Conference poster presentation
    San Diego, CA

    October, 2017

    Posters
    What Mothers Believe about Co-Sleeping and What the Research Shows: A Review
    Conference poster presentation
    Providence, RI

    March 25, 2017

    Oral Presentations
    Social Media and Culture
    All In Diversity Summit - Fayette
    Fayette campus

    Influence of social media on culture - including how different cultures use social media differently, how social media can be used to target others (bullying, negative feedback, discrimination), and developmental issues (imaginary audience, development of identity, ageing)